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Greatest Holes in Golf

What makes a great hole? We've collated our top holes and what makes them so special.

6 mins read

There are certain holes in golf which are spellbinding, from short par 3’s to long par 5’s, there is no set criteria for a great golf hole. Whether they provide tremendous scenery, great course design or a stern test of golf, there is nothing like playing a truly great golf hole…whether you play it well or not.

We are often asked by customers; what is the greatest hole in golf? So, we’ve put together a list of the very best.

St Andrews No. 18 | Par 4, 356 yards

The 18th hole on the Old Course may not be the most riveting hole in golf, but let’s be honest, is there a better sight in the game?

Playing at the Home of Golf is a spectacular encounter in itself. However, playing the final hole with the silhouette of the Auld Grey Toon providing the backdrop may be the peak of your golfing life. With the famed walk across Swilken Bridge, there are very few holes in the game as iconic as this one.

Trump Turnberry (Ailsa) No. 9 | Par 3, 248 yards

The signature hole on the recently refurbished Ailsa course at Turnberry is the 9th. This was the biggest and arguably best change from the 2016 redesign made by renowned architects Mackenzie & Ebert.

Once a par 4, the rocky terrain surrounding the venue’s iconic lighthouse hole has been transformed into one of the most spectacular par 3’s in all of golf, and a must for any keen golfer.

Pebble Beach No. 7 | Par 3, 112 yards

The most photographed hole in golf, nothing can come close to the sheer drama of the 7th at Pebble Beach. This minuscule hole is framed by the crashing waves of the Pacific and perfectly encapsulates the sheer beauty of this Californian mecca.

However, measuring a mere 112 yards, when the wind picks up this hole can much trickier than first meets the eye. Any ball that strays from the green is likely to find one of the surrounding bunkers, where getting up and down is a tough ask for even the most skilled golfers.

Royal County Down No. 4 | Par 3, 228 yards

Played from an elevated tee, with the spectacular backdrop of Slieve Donard Peak in the distance, the 4th at Royal County Down is simply one the most beautiful in golf.

The tee shot is played over a sea of gorse, 7 bunkers guard the front of the putting surface, and will gobble up any errant tee shot. The long and narrow green is tough to hit, making par a great result here.

Old Head Links No. 4 | Par 4, 427 yards

Prepare to be wowed! The 4th at Old Head Links is one of several spectacular holes at this truly remarkable links course. Set on a spectacular piece of land, the 4th tee box offers breath-taking views of the Atlantic Ocean, with the hole playing up to the iconic lighthouse on the edge of this magnificent peninsular.

The hole drops away dramatically on the left to the crashing waves below. The approach shot is a tough one, with the fairway narrowing as it gets closer to the green. An accurate second is needed in order to walk off this hole without finding trouble.

TPC Sawgrass No. 17 | Par 3, 132 yards

The merits of this hole have long been debated but there is no disputing that the 17th at Sawgrass is one of the most iconic holes in all of golf. With The Players Championship being held here annually, we get to see the pros nerves jangle over a par-3 measuring less than 140 yards

Known as the ‘Island Green’, and surrounded by water on all sides, there is no room for error here. Do you think you have what it takes to find the dry land?

Augusta National No. 13 | Par 5, 510 yards

Augusta National Golf Club is one of the most iconic golf courses in the game. Host to The Masters annually, viewers from around the world revel in the drama of the competition.

No. 13 at Augusta, known as Azalea, is a classic risk-reward par 5, with a draw needed off the tee if you are to reach the green in two. Whilst Rae’s creek runs the length of the hole, offering a tricky hazard to avoid short of the green.

Over the years, there has been plenty of drama on this hole, Phil Mickleson famously hit his second shot to 5 feet from the pine straw, on his way to victory in the 2010 Masters.

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